Facebook Like Box installation

Here at Server Observer we recently became converted tech-evangelicals for the Genesis / Studiopress theme framework and tweaked the innards out of one of the themes for out latest look. We like the simplicity and ease of the Genesis Simple Hooks plugin which allows us to ‘hook’ all manner if code and addons to the page framework – releasing u8s from the restrictions of more pedestrian themes.

If you have ever created an APP of Facebook before then your task to install a Facebook Like Box using Genesis and Simple hooks is, well … SIMPLE:

  • Log in to Facebook and go to this URL: https://developers.facebook.com/docs/plugins/like-box-for-pages
  • Fill in your Facebook Page URL, the width, height, colour scheme and options for your box and lick on Get Code.
  • You will be presented with a number of options – for the purposes of this exercise we selected iFrame.
  • Copy the iFrame Code and open up your WordPress Admin.
  • If you haven’t installed Genesis Simple Hooks, NOW would be a good time to do so by searching for Genesis Simple Hooks in the WP Plugin Repository.

Here at Server Observer we installed the Facebook Like Box just above the Footer as we wanted to take full advantage of the maximum container space of 1400 pixels across.

To do as we did go to Genesis Simple Hooks and do the following:

  • Determine the container width of your theme (look in your CSS or use a browser add-on like Meaure-It.)
  • Scroll down to Footer Hooks —-> genesis_before_footer and paste your Facebook Like Box code in there.
  • You may have to div center align the box.
  • Save Changes
  • Tweak and play to your satisfaction.

Don’t forget to add your face to those that like Server Observer in the Like Box below.

rel=”nofollow”

To follow or not to follow?

Now that is the question:

”What

Think before you accept that bottle of water

Google’s linking policy in its Terms of Service says:

Buying or selling links that pass PageRank. This includes exchanging money for links, or posts that contain links; exchanging goods or services for links; or sending someone a “free” product in exchange for them writing about it and including a link.

Imagine you own a fashion, music or travel news site – part of your job is to attend fashion or music events or sample tourist products.

The people owning these products are eager for you to expose them to your audience and you get invited to experience these products. This is something that has happened in the ‘traditional’ media space for years. Business invites reporters to be open and honest about their product. For the reporters this is a double benefit – he/she gets to mingle with the rich and famous experience the high life whilst also being paid to write about it.

Now – I have a theory, people are not dumb and will realise when someone writes about something in an insincere way. Eventually that writer and publication will lose his audience as they seek out the ‘truth’ rather than the ‘fluff’. This is natural and happens almost on an unconscious level.

BUT, this is where Google’s linking Terms of Service is headed for a clash with the real world as we still get reporters eager to share links to products that they recommend and, technically, they will be in violation of Google’s Terms of Service as I can bet you that the reporter did receive some form of “free” product, lunch or bottle of water as a thank you for attending a presentation.

Does this mean that every writer, reporter and blogger now needs to publish a legal document stating that they did not receive any “free” items and paid for their own tea / coffee / biscuits?

Does this mean that every article written about any business, fashion, music or tourism product will violate Google’s Terms of Service?

Is it okay, nay recommended, to link to an internal page about the company that you write about?

Frightening stuff when a ToS is so broad!

Dealing with those pesky WordPress Spam Registrations

Faced with the above dilemma I thought to myself; “Please NOT another plugin to deal with this scourge!”

The solution for me was pretty simple enough, though as the site in question does have Gravity Forms installed and collects additional information at registration – much like we do here on Server Observer for candidate authors.

The catch all address for registration on WordPress installations is …./wp-register.php so all I did was logged in to Cpanel and created a 301 (permanent) redirect from the wp-register.php address to the specific address where the author registration form is hosted. No plugin bloat – just easy, quick and simple.

Please remove my link

We know that Google is on the war path and mowing down web sites that have ‘unnatural’ or ‘spammy’ links pointing to them.

As the owner of a number of news/directory sites I am going to let you in on my ‘secrets’:

  • When I established my first community news site I wanted to showcase business and let people click though to a page that offered essential contact information on ONE page, whether the business had a web site or not.
  • I found that the same businesses came up time and time again in the news section.
  • It became a pain to link to each of these businesses contact pages or provide contact details for each that didn’t have a web site.
  • The solution: establish a directory so that I had ONE page to point to which, in turn, had ONE outgoing link to a businesses web site.
  • What I didn’t realise at the time was that the directory would become a valuable resource – and even more so for those people who didn’t have a web site as it gave them valuable online exposure for no cost.
  • At no time did I attempt to sell links or accept just anyone – for 10 years I have stuck to my respective narrow niches and avoided spamming the search engines with hundreds of external links for a single web site.
  • My business case: “Everything in Moderation”

This philosophy has stood me in good stead – slow and steady growth.

But now everyone who indulged in wholesale linking from every kind of directory in the world is now running around and removing themselves from every directory they can find just to try and get back in Google’s good graces.

Hence I am in receipt of a few (as in three in the last month) emails as the one you see below. If I consider that I only received 3 out of tens of thousands of listings then I remain convinced that my method of playing nice has been the correct one.

Hi there

We have recently received a notification from Google stating that our website www.SomeSpammyNamedWebSite.com has unnatural links pointing towards it. This has really damaged our rankings on Google and as a result, we’re trying to clear things up.

Below is a sample list of pages from your site – www.OneofMySites.co.za – with links pointing to our website:

www.OneofMySites.co.za/cgi-bin/rprtb.cgi?id=2297&cid=28881
www.OneofMySites.co.za/pages/info/2297-Some_Spammy_Named_WebSite.html

Could you please remove all links pointing to our website, or add the rel=’nofollow’ attribute to the links pointing to our site?

I appreciate this is inconvenient and isn’t a reflection on your website at all, but if you’re able to remove the links, we would really appreciate it and would be very grateful.

If you have any questions – feel free to contact me.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards from

Confused CEO
www.SomeSpammyNamedWebSite.com

In all three cases I removed the listings immediately.

In two of the cases the initial request was followed up after a few days ‘reminding’ me AGAIN to remove the links. You will appreciate that the second request will be viewed by myself as somewhat irksome!

It is at this point that Matt Cutts’ ears must surely be burning as I begin to curse Google’s latest attempt to penalise people who have been naughty as I offer up a not so silent approximation of a shouted prayer that Google should rather punish the sites that the links come from instead of the hapless buggers who went and embarked on a wholesale linking campaign thinking that quantity beats quality every time. Stooooopid.

So I ask – maybe I should ask people to pay to have listings removed that they initially submitted?

The year 2013 in Google

In a press release issued today, Google announced its annual year-end Zeitgeist, showing the top searches from specific countries and around the world.

South Africa is among the countries listed in Google Zeitgeist, and a South African icon, former president Nelson Mandela, also topped Google’s global rankings.

These lists are of interest to search marketers following on from Google now ‘not providing’ keywords that people use on their search engine to find web sites.

See below for abridged versions of Google’s lists of the top searches and fads for 2013.

Build your own Google News RSS hyperlink

On one of my sites I use an aggregator to find specific articles on Google News.

Now in the past it was relatively easy – plug your search term into Google News, check that he results were relevant, scroll down to the footer of the Google News page and a handy RSS link would be available for you to copy and paste into your aggregator/news reader/RSS widget.

Now, horror of horrors, all that seems to be available is a link inviting you to create an email alert. Personally I think that Google is doing themselves a disservice by NOT making the RSS feed available. Sure, some people will use it for nefarious means just like some people use kitchen knives for nefarious means but, we don’t see a general ban on kitchen knives do we?

Point of clarity – the RSS has not been taken away completely, just the displayed link that was generated.

Here follows a method for you to build your own Google News RSS link:

  • One of my RSS feeds is for the search term email fraud alert -shareholder -investor (I am looking for all news articles containing the words email fraud and alert but NOT containing the words shareholder or investor).
  • The RSS link for the above search looks like this: https://news.google.com/news/feeds?q=email+fraud+alert&#45shareholder&#45investor&output=rss
  • Often you may see the ASCII Hex form of the plus sign between each keyword: %2B
  • I have found that using the ASCII Hex form for the MINUS (%2D) sign does not seem to work (in my Firefox browser) so I used the ASCII HTML Form instead: &#45
  • Hence the ‘meat’ of the RSS search term looks like this – email+fraud+alert&#45shareholder&#45investor
  • If you are targeting two or more keywords as a phrase you need to encase them in a “” and the search term will then look like this: email+”fraud+alert”&#45shareholder&#45investor
  • If you find that the ” does not work then use the ASCII HTML Form equivalent: &#34
  • The Google News RSS does not seem to play nicely in some browsers when you place two ASCII Codes next to each other in the same string and converts the ASCII to the symbol hence this string also works: “email%2Bfraud%2Balert&#45shareholder&#45investor
Google News RSS

Google News RSS

Have fun building your own Google News RSS Search strings.

See the ASCII strings and conversions below:

Standard ASCII set, HTML Entity names, ISO 10646, ISO 8879, ISO 8859-1 Latin alphabet No. 1
Browser support: All browsers
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
!

#
$
%
&

(
)
*
+
,

.
/
 
!
"
#
$
%
&
'
(
)
*
+
,
-
.
/
"& space
exclamation point
double quotes
number sign
dollar sign
percent sign
ampersand
single quote
opening parenthesis
closing parenthesis
asterisk
plus sign
comma
minus sign – hyphen
period
slash
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
&#48;
&#49;
&#50;
&#51;
&#52;
&#53;
&#54;
&#55;
&#56;
&#57;
&#58;
&#59;
&#60;
&#61;
&#62;
&#63;
&lt;&gt; zero
one
two
three
four
five
six
seven
eight
nine
colon
semicolon
less than sign
equal sign
greater than sign
question mark
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
&#64;
&#65;
&#66;
&#67;
&#68;
&#69;
&#70;
&#71;
&#72;
&#73;
&#74;
&#75;
&#76;
&#77;
&#78;
&#79;
at symbol
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
&#80;
&#81;
&#82;
&#83;
&#84;
&#85;
&#86;
&#87;
&#88;
&#89;
&#90;
&#91;
&#92;
&#93;
&#94;
&#95;
opening bracket
backslash
closing bracket
caret – circumflex
underscore
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
`
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
&#96;
&#97;
&#98;
&#99;
&#100;
&#101;
&#102;
&#103;
&#104;
&#105;
&#106;
&#107;
&#108;
&#109;
&#110;
&#111;
grave accent
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
&#112;
&#113;
&#114;
&#115;
&#116;
&#117;
&#118;
&#119;
&#120;
&#121;
&#122;
&#123;
&#124;
&#125;
&#126;
opening brace
vertical bar
closing brace
equivalency sign – tilde
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
8A
8B
8C
8D
8E
8F
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
9A
9B
9C
9D
9E
9F
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
(not defined in HTML 4 standard)
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
AA
AB
AC
AD
AE
AF
¡
¢
£
¤
¥
¦
§
¨
©
ª
«
¬
­
®
¯
&#160;
&#161;
&#162;
&#163;
&#164;
&#165;
&#166;
&#167;
&#168;
&#169;
&#170;
&#171;
&#172;
&#173;
&#174;
&#175;
&nbsp;
&iexcl;
&cent;
&pound;
&curren;
&yen;
&brvbar;
&sect;
&uml;
&copy;
&ordf;
&laquo;
&not;
&shy;
&reg;
&macr;
non-breaking space
inverted exclamation mark
cent sign
pound sign
currency sign
yen sign
broken vertical bar
section sign
spacing diaeresis – umlaut
copyright sign
feminine ordinal indicator
left double angle quotes
not sign
soft hyphen
registered trade mark sign
spacing macron – overline
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
BA
BB
BC
BD
BE
BF
°
±
²
³
´
µ

·
¸
¹
º
»
¼
½
¾
¿
&#176;
&#177;
&#178;
&#179;
&#180;
&#181;
&#182;
&#183;
&#184;
&#185;
&#186;
&#187;
&#188;
&#189;
&#190;
&#191;
&deg;
&plusmn;
&sup2;
&sup3;
&acute;
&micro;
&para;
&middot;
&cedil;
&sup1;
&ordm;
&raquo;
&frac14;
&frac12;
&frac34;
&iquest;
degree sign
plus-or-minus sign
superscript two – squared
superscript three – cubed
acute accent – spacing acute
micro sign
pilcrow sign – paragraph sign
middle dot – Georgian comma
spacing cedilla
superscript one
masculine ordinal indicator
right double angle quotes
fraction one quarter
fraction one half
fraction three quarters
inverted question mark
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
C0
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
CA
CB
CC
CD
CE
CF
À
Á
Â
Ã
Ä
Å
Æ
Ç
È
É
Ê
Ë
Ì
Í
Î
Ï
&#192;
&#193;
&#194;
&#195;
&#196;
&#197;
&#198;
&#199;
&#200;
&#201;
&#202;
&#203;
&#204;
&#205;
&#206;
&#207;
&Agrave;
&Aacute;
&Acirc;
&Atilde;
&Auml;
&Aring;
&AElig;
&Ccedil;
&Egrave;
&Eacute;
&Ecirc;
&Euml;
&Igrave;
&Iacute;
&Icirc;
&Iuml;
latin capital letter A with grave
latin capital letter A with acute
latin capital letter A with circumflex
latin capital letter A with tilde
latin capital letter A with diaeresis
latin capital letter A with ring above
latin capital letter AE
latin capital letter C with cedilla
latin capital letter E with grave
latin capital letter E with acute
latin capital letter E with circumflex
latin capital letter E with diaeresis
latin capital letter I with grave
latin capital letter I with acute
latin capital letter I with circumflex
latin capital letter I with diaeresis
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
DA
DB
DC
DD
DE
DF
Ð
Ñ
Ò
Ó
Ô
Õ
Ö
×
Ø
Ù
Ú
Û
Ü
Ý
Þ
ß
&#208;
&#209;
&#210;
&#211;
&#212;
&#213;
&#214;
&#215;
&#216;
&#217;
&#218;
&#219;
&#220;
&#221;
&#222;
&#223;
&ETH;
&Ntilde;
&Ograve;
&Oacute;
&Ocirc;
&Otilde;
&Ouml;
&times;
&Oslash;
&Ugrave;
&Uacute;
&Ucirc;
&Uuml;
&Yacute;
&THORN;
&szlig;
latin capital letter ETH
latin capital letter N with tilde
latin capital letter O with grave
latin capital letter O with acute
latin capital letter O with circumflex
latin capital letter O with tilde
latin capital letter O with diaeresis
multiplication sign
latin capital letter O with slash
latin capital letter U with grave
latin capital letter U with acute
latin capital letter U with circumflex
latin capital letter U with diaeresis
latin capital letter Y with acute
latin capital letter THORN
latin small letter sharp s – ess-zed
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
E0
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
E7
E8
E9
EA
EB
EC
ED
EE
EF
à
á
â
ã
ä
å
æ
ç
è
é
ê
ë
ì
í
î
ï
&#224;
&#225;
&#226;
&#227;
&#228;
&#229;
&#230;
&#231;
&#232;
&#233;
&#234;
&#235;
&#236;
&#237;
&#238;
&#239;
&agrave;
&aacute;
&acirc;
&atilde;
&auml;
&aring;
&aelig;
&ccedil;
&egrave;
&eacute;
&ecirc;
&euml;
&igrave;
&iacute;
&icirc;
&iuml;
latin small letter a with grave
latin small letter a with acute
latin small letter a with circumflex
latin small letter a with tilde
latin small letter a with diaeresis
latin small letter a with ring above
latin small letter ae
latin small letter c with cedilla
latin small letter e with grave
latin small letter e with acute
latin small letter e with circumflex
latin small letter e with diaeresis
latin small letter i with grave
latin small letter i with acute
latin small letter i with circumflex
latin small letter i with diaeresis
ASCII HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
F0
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
FA
FB
FC
FD
FE
FF
ð
ñ
ò
ó
ô
õ
ö
÷
ø
ù
ú
û
ü
ý
þ
ÿ
&#240;
&#241;
&#242;
&#243;
&#244;
&#245;
&#246;
&#247;
&#248;
&#249;
&#250;
&#251;
&#252;
&#253;
&#254;
&#255;
&eth;
&ntilde;
&ograve;
&oacute;
&ocirc;
&otilde;
&ouml;
&divide;
&oslash;
&ugrave;
&uacute;
&ucirc;
&uuml;
&yacute;
&thorn;
&yuml;
latin small letter eth
latin small letter n with tilde
latin small letter o with grave
latin small letter o with acute
latin small letter o with circumflex
latin small letter o with tilde
latin small letter o with diaeresis
division sign
latin small letter o with slash
latin small letter u with grave
latin small letter u with acute
latin small letter u with circumflex
latin small letter u with diaeresis
latin small letter y with acute
latin small letter thorn
latin small letter y with diaeresis
HTML 4.01, ISO 10646, ISO 8879, Latin extended A and B,
Browser support: Internet Explorer > 4, Netscape > 4
HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

338
339
352
353
376
402
152
153
160
161
178
192
Œ
œ
Š
š
Ÿ
ƒ
&#338;
&#339;
&#352;
&#353;
&#376;
&#402;
latin capital letter OE
latin small letter oe
latin capital letter S with caron
latin small letter s with caron
latin capital letter Y with diaeresis
latin small f with hook – function
HTML HTML
Dec Hex Symbol Number Name Description

8211
8212
8216
8217
8218
8220
8221
8222
8224
8225
8226
8230
8240
8364
8482
2013
2014
2018
2019
201A
201C
201D
201E
2020
2021
2022
2026
2030
20AC
2122














&#8211;
&#8212;
&#8216;
&#8217;
&#8218;
&#8220;
&#8221;
&#8222;
&#8224;
&#8225;
&#8226;
&#8230;
&#8240;
&#8364;
&#8482;
&euro; en dash
em dash
left single quotation mark
right single quotation mark
single low-9 quotation mark
left double quotation mark
right double quotation mark
double low-9 quotation mark
dagger
double dagger
bullet
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South Africa silent as we mourn Madiba

With the death of Nelson Rolihlala Mandela at his home in Houghton, Johannesburg at 8:50 pm on Thursday, 5 December 2013 the world went into mourning.

Obituaries and statements from television, radio, print and online publications began flooding the world.

Personally – I posted my draft obituary (prepared in July 2013 already) and then proceeded to edit and publish hundreds of press releases sent to me for consideration on the passing of the great man.

A couple of hours down the line I paused to have a look and see which articles published on 6 December were the most read for the day.

One of the articles I published on 6 December I expected to do well as it featured an extraordinary image and very unique content.

AND I learned a valuable SEO lesson as well that I am sure is related to the new Google Algorithm.

So far today the most read story on MyPE is: How to Fly the Flag at Half Mast and the second most read story is the one with unique content: An Extraordinary Graphic Tribute to Madiba.

This I am convinced is a sure indication that:

  • You MUST post articles in the form of questions and answers to knowledge that people will seeking. (I posted the Half Mast article 6 months ago)
  • The new Google Hummingbird algorithm is skewed towards this type of ‘knowledge’
  • Your articles must have lots of unique content and knowledge.
Madiba Tribute

Madiba Tribute

Contact Rainer Schimpf at Expert Tours to learn more or order a copy of the Nelson Mandela tribute above titled; “The Face of a Nation”.

Rainer says; “These individual images represent the character and nature of the Eastern Cape. Also included are some images from other places within SA and cities that Madiba visited during his lifetime.”

The aim of this extraordinary image is to leave a legecy of the connections between nature and Madiba who grew up in the rural areas that he so loved. Schimpf is convinced that Mandela had the opportunity and time to spend time out at sea as well. Events like the Sardine Run along the Transkei Coast have had a cultural influence on the Xhosa which is also reflected in some of the images.

The selection of images created by Alison and Rainer will be printed on Acrylic in sizes ranging from 60 x 80 to 200 x 150cm.

A portion of the proceeds will be donated to The Rhino Fund and Ocean Messengers NGO.

Contact Alison Williams to learn more.

Setting Up Email Accounts Using Cpanel

You have just secured your domain and want to set up an email account.

In a Linux environment you will, in all likelihood have a web site control panel called Cpanel (DUH!). Your web hosting provider will provide you with a username and password to allow you to access Cpanel. This username and password combination is normally also used in your FTP client as well. FTP is a method to transfer files from your local machine to your web server.

Accessing Cpanel can be done in a number of ways:

  • yourdomain.co.za:2082
  • yourdomain.co.za:2083
  • yourdomain.co.za/cpanel

are some examples.

To set up your email address do the following:

  1. Log in to your Cpanel using the username and password provided by your web host.
  2. In Cpanel click on the logo and hyperlink that says Email Accounts
  3. Fill in the required information and click Create Account.

Getting your email to work in your desktop email client:

The quickest method is to; add a new email account and use mail.yourdomain.co.za for the INCOMING mail server and your ISP’s SMTP server for the OUTGOING mail server (e.g. for Telkom it is smtp.dsl.telkomsa.net).

See http://www.serverobserver.co.za/web-hosting/how-to-set-up-accounts-using-cpanel/ for images.

Online sales people need thick monitors (skin?)

Busy publishers are kinda busy – DUH!

We have to deal with a myriad of tasks during the day and learned how to walk, talk, chew bubblegum, exercise, tweet, text and look interested all at the same time a long time ago.

That aside – it is not polite to insult our intelligence by sending an unsolicited advert from a web form that specifically does not ask for your sales pitch AND if it looks like the one below you are certainly headed for the SPAM bin in record time [my remarks in the square brackets]:

Hi!! [Okay buddy – 2 exclamation marks? Does that mean I have to take notice? Of your amateur approach maybe]

I am from removed.com and I have gone through your website. [Is this supposed to creep me out or impress me? I think not]

I see you as a potential publisher with whom we can coalescence. [SERIOUSLY? I had to look coalescence up and some of the definitions are a bit creepy!]

Our website is an eminent global advertising network which is geared to help you monetize the most of your inventory. [Here we go with the strange words again – EMINENT!]

Removed gives you quality creatives from the top performance advertisers. [Which means WHAT?]

The outcome is effective advertising which engages audience with high quality campaigns. [And I DON’T make money?]

Our Payment mode is Paypal, Money Bookers, Direct Deposits and the payment is done on monthly basis. [When I reach a $1000.00?]

Please get back to us at your earliest convenience. [No]

We would like to evaluate your requirements and monetize your inventory which adds value to your site. [You SAY you went through my site so YOU make a pitch that will make me take notice]

A member of our experienced publisher support team will be in touch. [When hell freezes over I am sure]

Sign Up today and maximize your revenue at: removed.com/publisherregistration.aspx

Regards,
Charles, [Give me your surname so that I can STALK you to see if you are legit]
Marketing Manager.